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Dental injuries

Key points

  • Dental injuries tend to happen as a result of a blow to your mouth and can lead to a tooth or teeth being cracked, chipped or knocked out.
  • If your tooth is knocked out but isn’t broken, try to reimplant it in your mouth – make sure it’s the right way up.
  • Don’t try to reimplant children’s teeth or teeth that are broken.
  • Treatment will vary depending on the damage to your tooth.
  • If you play a lot of sport that puts you at risk of dental injuries, wearing a mouthguard can help to prevent these.

Featured FAQ

My child fell and cut the inside of his lip with his front teeth. Will this affect his developing adult teeth?

The main factors that determine whether or not your child's adult teeth will be affected include his age and how severe the injury is. Take your child to the dentist as soon as possible so that his teeth and gums can be checked for any wobbliness, swelling or discolouration.

See all our FAQs about dental injuries

Further information

Sources

  • Guideline on management of acute dental trauma. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. www.aapd.org, published 2011
  • The justification for orthodontic treatment. British Orthodontic Society. www.bos.org.uk, published 2008
  • Dental injuries. Epilepsy Society. www.epilepsysociety.org.uk, published March 2012
  • Information for patients. International Association of Dental Traumatology. www.iadt-dentaltrauma.org, accessed 21 June 2013
  • Dental care. Better Health Channel. www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au, published October 2011
  • Management of dental trauma. eMedicine. www.emedicine.medscape.com, published April 2012
  • Caring for your mouth after a dental injury. British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. www.baoms.org.uk, accessed 22 June 2013
  • Caring for teeth. British Dental Health Foundation. www.dentalhealth.org, accessed 14 August 2013

 

For our main content on this topic, see Information.

For answers to frequently asked questions on this topic, see FAQs.

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  • This information was published by Bupa's Health Information Team and is based on reputable sources of medical evidence. It has been reviewed by appropriate medical or clinical professionals. Photos are only for illustrative purposes and do not reflect every presentation of a condition. The content is intended only for general information and does not replace the need for personal advice from a qualified health professional. For more details on how we produce our content and its sources, visit the about our health information page.

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