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Hiatus hernia

Key points

  • Hiatus hernia is when part of your stomach slides upwards into your chest, through a hole in your diaphragm.
  • Many people with a hiatus hernia have no symptoms. However, some people develop heartburn.
  • The exact cause of hiatus hernia isn’t known. However, you’re more likely to develop it if you’re overweight and as you get older (over 50).
  • Treatment aims to relieve symptoms. Changing your lifestyle, taking medicines and having surgery are possible treatments.

Further information

Sources

  • Simon C, Everitt H, van Dorp F. Oxford Handbook of General Practice. 3rd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, 394-5
  • Hiatal hernia. eMedicine. emedicine.medscape.com, published July 2013
  • Dyspepsia. Clinical Knowledge Summaries. cks.nice.org.uk, published November 2012
  • Heartburn and reflux. CORE Charity. www.corecharity.org.uk, published July 2013
  • Dyspepsia. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE).2004 www.nice.org.uk
  • Joint Formulary Committee. British National Formulary (online) London: BMJ group and Pharmaceutical Press. www.medicinescomplete.com, accessed 31 July 2013.
  • Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication. eMedicine. emedicine.medscape.com, published February 2012
  • Guidelines for Surgical Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons. www.sages.org, accessed 31 July 2013
  • Start active, stay active: a report on physical activity from the four home countries’ Chief Medical Officers. Department of Health. www.gov.uk, published July 2011
  • Hiatus hernia. Merck Manuals. www.merckmanuals.com, published June 2006
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. eMedicine. emedicine.medscape.com, published May 2013
  • Hiatus hernia. PatientPlus. www.patient.co.uk, published August 2011
  • Patient Information for Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD). Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons www.sages.org, accessed 23 October 2013
  • Overview of the esophagus. Merck Manuals. www.merckmanuals.com, published October 2007
  • Murray L, Johnston B, Lane A et al. Relationship between body mass and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms: The Bristol Helicobacter Project Int. J. Epidemiol. (2003) 32 (4): 645–650 ije.oxfordjournals.org

 

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  • This information was published by Bupa's Health Information Team and is based on reputable sources of medical evidence. It has been reviewed by appropriate medical or clinical professionals. Photos are only for illustrative purposes and do not reflect every presentation of a condition. The content is intended only for general information and does not replace the need for personal advice from a qualified health professional. For more details on how we produce our content and its sources, visit the about our health information page.

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