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Stress

Stress is a term used to describe how you feel and respond when the pressure you’re under exceeds your ability to cope. A certain amount of stress can be positive as it can help you prepare for actions and challenges. But too much stress, especially over a long period of time, can cause both mental and physical problems.

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  • About About stress

    Your body’s automatic response to unexpected events is known as your ‘fight or flight’ response. When you have a shock, or perceive something as a threat, your body releases hormones. These are chemicals produced by your body, such as adrenalin, that contribute to this ‘fight or flight’ response. They increase your heart rate and blood pressure and you breathe faster so that more oxygen and glucose can get to your muscles. All of these reactions prepare you to take action to deal with a possible threat.

    Modern day stresses, such as money worries or deadlines at work, cause your body to release stress hormones. In the short term, stress ‘revs up’ your body and heightens your ability to carry out tasks and meet deadlines. But over a long time, stress can actually have a negative effect on how you cope with situations, and it might damage your health.

  • Impact Impact of stress

    Everyone reacts to stress differently – it can depend on your personality and how you respond to pressure. But there are some common effects to look out for.

    Mental effects of stress can include:

    • feeling that you can’t cope
    • constantly worrying
    • finding it hard to concentrate and remember things
    • feeling disappointed with yourself
    • lacking confidence
    • seeing only the negative things in life

    Emotional effects of stress can include:

    • mood swings
    • feeling irritable or having a short temper
    • feeling overwhelmed
    • feeling depressed or anxious
    • feeling more emotional – you might be more tearful or sensitive

    You might also start behaving differently and you may:

    • eat more, or less, than usual
    • sleep too much or too little
    • drink alcohol, smoke or take illegal drugs to relax
    • become more aggressive

    Stress can affect you physically too and cause problems such as:

    • feeling tired and that you have no energy
    • trouble sleeping
    • stomach ache
    • aches and pains
    • diarrhoea and constipation
    • feeling sick
    • chest pains, or tightness in your chest
    • headaches
    • losing your desire to have sex

    These effects may be caused by problems other than stress. But if you have any of them, talk to friends and family about it. If you’ve been having problems for a while (longer than a couple of weeks), or they’re affecting your daily life – contact your GP.

    Stress can also make some other health conditions worse. For more information, see FAQ: Stress and health.

  • Identifying Identifying stress

    There isn’t a specific test to diagnose stress. If you think you’re stressed or if you feel very anxious, contact your GP. They’ll usually be able to recognise the effects and give you advice about how to deal with it.

    It’s normal to feel reluctant to ask for help if you’re stressed or feel under pressure. But don’t be afraid to speak to your friends or family, or your GP. It’s important to recognise the effects of stress so you can learn how to manage them and begin to feel better.

    One way of helping to identify your stress triggers, how you react to them and how they make you feel, is to keep a diary. You could make a note of what made you stressed, how stressed you became, what effects you experienced, and how you coped.

  • Treatment Treatment options for stress

    There are lots of ways of dealing with stress and the one or ones that work for you may be different to what works for someone else. There aren’t any medicines to treat stress. Things like changing the way you approach your life, counselling or cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) may help you cope better.

    Helping yourself

    Exercise can help to relieve stress, and it’s good for your wellbeing. It can improve your mood, give you a sense of achievement and help you release tension. When you exercise, your body releases endorphins (the hormones that make you feel good). Take a walk or get some fresh air during the day as both exercise and daylight are good for both your mental and physical health. For more tips on getting more active, see Related information.

    There are other things you can try to help deal with and manage your stress better.

    • Manage your time better and prioritise more important jobs first.
    • Lead a healthy lifestyle – eat a healthy balanced diet, exercise regularly, and get enough sleep.
    • Know your limits – don’t take on too much.
    • Find out what makes you feel stressed and try to change your thoughts and behaviour to reduce it. It might help to talk things over with friends or family.
    • Accept the things you can’t change and concentrate on the things you have control over.
    • Make time for the activities you enjoy and for the things that make you feel relaxed. You’re more likely to neglect this area of your life if you’re stressed.
    • Find time to meet friends.
    • Develop a positive thinking style – try to look at a problem differently or discuss it with someone.
    • Don’t drink too much alcohol, or caffeine, or use tobacco or illegal drugs as a way to cope. In the long term, these things will only make you feel worse.

    You can also learn techniques to manage your stress from self-help books, podcasts and CDs. Or, by attending a stress management course. For more tips, see FAQ: How to relax.

    Some people find that meditative approaches can help to reduce stress and anxiety. These include things like:

    • mindfulness
    • meditation – this can help you learn to reduce anxious thoughts and become calmer
    • yoga or tai chi – these help you control your breathing and relax your mind – see Related information for more information on the benefits of yoga
    • relaxation techniques

    Explore the options available and find a solution that fits you, your lifestyle, work and personality. There’s no right or wrong approach as everyone reacts to stress in different ways. And different approaches will work for different people.

    Talking therapies

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking treatment that can help treat stress. It looks at how situations can lead to thoughts that affect your feelings and behaviour. It aims to change the way you think and behave, and helps you to challenge negative thoughts or feelings. For more information, see our topic on CBT.

    Complementary therapies

    Some people find that complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, aromatherapy, reflexology and herbal remedies, offer some benefit. But there isn’t enough evidence to say if they work or not.

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  • Causes Causes of stress

    Sometimes there’s no obvious cause for stress – all sorts of situations can cause it. Some of the common triggers for stress are:

    • unachievable work demands – see work-related stress for more information
    • money matters
    • difficult relationships with partners, children or other family
    • separating from a partner, or divorce
    • losing your job
    • moving house
    • having a baby
    • bereavement

    Stress can also be caused by a build-up of small things over time. You might have trouble commuting to work, or you may have a child whose behaviour has been consistently hard to deal with.

  • FAQ: Stress and sleep Can stress affect my sleep patterns?

    Yes, a common effect of stress is poor sleep (insomnia), which can make you feel even worse. Around a third of people in the UK have trouble sleeping. If you’re stressed or anxious about things, you might find it hard to fall sleep. You may also wake up during the night and have trouble getting back to sleep. But there are some simple steps you can take to try and help you sleep better. For simple tips on how, see Related information.

  • FAQ: Stress and health Can stress cause other illnesses?

    There are some links between stress and certain illnesses. If you have a pre-existing health condition, stress can make it worse, or flare up. Examples of conditions that can be aggravated by stress include migraine, eczema, asthma, irritable bowel syndrome and psoriasis.

    If you have rheumatoid arthritis, stress may cause a flare-up of your symptoms. Being stressed or anxious may also mean you’re more likely to get constipation or trigger an asthma attack.

    There isn’t any evidence to show that stress directly causes coronary heart disease, such as a heart attack or stroke. But if you smoke, drink, or eat more to cope with stress, you increase your risk of these. Stressful situations can raise your blood pressure temporarily too. If you’re stressed over a long time, you could possibly develop long-term high blood pressure. If you exercise regularly, it can help to reduce your stress levels and blood pressure.

  • FAQ: How to relax How can I relax after a tough day?

    If you feel stressed or under pressure, there are some techniques you can learn to help you relax and wind down.

    Simple breathing exercises can improve your sense of wellbeing and lower your stress levels. See our blogs for information on relaxation for tips on techniques you can learn and how to combat everyday stress.

  • FAQ: post-traumatic stress disorder What's post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

    PTSD is a particularly severe form of stress that can affect anyone and happens after a major traumatic event.

    If you have PTSD, you may get any of the common effects of stress (see Impact of stress above). It’s also characterised by:

    • re-experiencing symptoms – these may occur as flashbacks in the daytime when you’re awake or as nightmares when you’re asleep
    • staying away from people or places that remind you of the event
    • emotional numbing – this means that you find it difficult to express and experience feelings
    • being ‘on guard’ all the time and looking around for danger

    Just some of the treatments that might help include:

    For more information about PTSD and these treatments, see our page on post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • FAQ: Exercise What exercise is best for relieving stress?

    Any exercise that makes you breathe harder and gets your heart beating faster can be helpful. It doesn’t matter what type, as long as you enjoy it and can do it often.

    Exercise helps to reduce stress hormones (chemicals produced by your body) and stimulates the release of endorphins in your body. These are the hormones that make you feel good. Exercise can also help raise your self-esteem and reduce anxiety or depression. Exercising might also help you sleep better.

    It’s easy to build exercise into your daily life. See Related information for tips on how.

  • Other helpful websites Other helpful websites

    Further information

    Big White Wall

    This online, anonymous community provides a secure environment for you to seek help if you’re feeling stressed, anxious or down about anything. You can share stories to get and give advice, find information and do courses to understand better how you’re feeling and make positive change. And trained professionals keep an eye on things 24 hours a day to make sure everyone stays safe and supported.

    Be Mindful

    This website-based mindfulness programme is made up of 10 30-minute modules for you to do at your own pace. It teaches mindfulness techniques to help you manage stress or simply to try to live a happier, healthier life. The programme uses audio clips, text-based information and a library of resources and exercises, and you can track your progress as you go along.

    Mind

    The charity Mind has information to support people with a mental health condition and those who care for them. If you’re stressed, they have a range of in-depth content, including these relaxation techniques.

     

    They also have suggestions of ways to manage or relieve stress.

     

    You may find these short, sharp tips helpful for coping with stress.

     

    Mind's booklet ‘How to manage stress’ pulls together all their content covering what stress is and its causes, and things you can do to cope.

    Rethink Mental Illness

    This charity has support groups, runs campaigns and can direct you to local mental health services, as well as providing information. One of their resources – the ‘Good health guide’ – sets out practical steps that people with mental illness can take to look after their physical health.

    Mental Health Foundation

    The Mental Health Foundation is a charity that carries out research and offers information about many areas of mental health. Their comprehensive page about stress gives details about the different causes and symptoms. It also gives advice about how you can tackle it but also where to go if you want professional help.

    Sources

    • Feeling stressed. Royal College of Psychiatrists. www.rcpsych.ac.uk, published June 2015
    • Adult stress – frequently asked questions. National Institute of Mental Health. www.nimh.nih.gov, accessed 7 November 2016
    • Mental health. Oxford handbook of general practice (online). Oxford Medicine Online. oxfordmedicine.com, published April 2014
    • The endocrine response to stress. Oxford textbook of endocrinology and diabetes (online). Oxford Medicine Online. oxfordmedicine.com, published July 2011
    • How to...manage and reduce stress. Mental Health Foundation. www.mentalhealth.org.uk, accessed 2 November 2016
    • Physical activity and the environment. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), 23 January 2008. www.nice.org.uk
    • Alcohol and mental health. Drinkaware. www.drinkaware.co.uk, accessed 4 November 2016
    • Meditation: in depth. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. nccih.nih.gov, last updated April 2016
    • Mind and body approaches for stress. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. nccih.nih.gov, published January 2016
    • Cognitive behavioural therapy Royal College of Psychiatrists. www.rcpsych.ac.uk, updated July 2013
    • Chamine I, Oken BS. Expectancy of stress-reducing aromatherapy effect and performance on a stress-sensitive cognitive task. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2015; 2015:419812. doi: 10.1155/2015/419812
    • Complementary and alternative medicine. PatientPlus. patient.info/patientplus, last checked 11 February 2016
    • Complementary and alternative medicines 2. Royal College of Psychiatrists. www.rcpsych.ac.uk, published January 2014
    • Insomnia. NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries. cks.nice.org.uk, last revised April 2015
    • Coping with stress. British Heart Foundation. www.bhf.org.uk, published 1 May 2013
    • Risk factors for coronary artery disease. Medscape. emedicine.medscape.com, updated 22 November 2015
    • How to manage stress. Mind. www.mind.org.uk, published March 2015
    • Essential hypertension. BMJ Best Practice. bestpractice.bmj.com, last updated 3 February 2016
    • Post-traumatic stress disorder. BMJ Best Practice. bestpractice.bmj.com, last updated 9 March 2016
    • Physical activity guidelines for adults (19–64 years) Department of Health. www.gov.uk, published 11 July 2011
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    Reviewed by Rachael Mayfield-Blake, Bupa Health Content Team, February 2017
    Expert reviewer Dr Gabrielle Pendlebury, Consultant in child and adolescent psychiatry

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