Your teen’s health

We’re here for you so you can be here for them

Every parent knows how difficult it is being a teenager. Whether they’re dealing with changes to their bodies or contending with self-esteem issues or peer pressure, there’s a lot to deal with on a day-to-day basis.

As parents of teenagers, you want to support them through this challenging time the best you can. That’s why we’ve provided useful advice and health information to help you navigate them through any issues, big or small. You’ll also have 24/7 support for you and your family via our Anytime HealthLine with our health insurance.

Call our Anytime HealthLine on 0345 601 3216^

Calls may be recorded and, to maintain the quality of our Bupa Anytime HealthLine service, a nursing manager may monitor some calls, always respecting the confidentiality of the call.

Interested in private healthcare for your children? We’ve got your family covered.

With our family health insurance, if a member of your family gets poorly we’ll make sure they get all the help they need , fast – so you can get right back to family time.


 

 

  • Mental health

  • Eating disorders

  • Acne

It can be greatly upsetting and distressing to know your child may be showing signs of mental ill-health. Even when your child is slightly ‘out of sorts’, it can be hard to know whether to be worried, how to approach the situation, or where to turn for support.

You know your child better than anyone else – so you’ll know if something’s up. You can often spot the early signs of low mood or depression through a ‘flatness’ in your child’s voice. Although teenagers can be known for grunting and moodiness, there are other underlying or subtle indications that parents pick up when things aren’t quite right. You might have noticed that they:

  • have become very withdrawn
  • are persistently sad or more tearful
  • get more irritated or angry than usual
  • can’t sleep, or sleep a lot more than usual
  • are exhausted all the time
  • have no appetite
  • have a permanent sense of hopelessness

It’s worth considering what’s going on at school or college. Changes in their attendance, interest, concentration or performance can sometimes indicate a problem, or they might have become disruptive and uncooperative. Some children may simply start refusing to go to school altogether. Outside of school, are they losing interest in hobbies, clubs or seeing friends? Have they withdrawn completely into an online world?

Early intervention is key. If you suspect that your child might be depressed – whether it’s your inner voice or obvious changes in behaviour, personality, mood or attitude – talk to your child. Ask them what’s troubling them and tell them that you’re worried. Explain that you’re there for them and listen without judging.

Our health insurance has your family’s mental health covered

If you’re concerned about child’s mental health, we’re here to listen. We can arrange a telephone consultation with one of our counsellors. They’ll listen to your child’s concerns and discuss options to help them on the road to feeling better.

Find out more >

A parent’s guide to spotting the signs of mental health problems Read more >

It’s not always going to be obvious if your child has an eating disorder. It’s common to believe it’s something you can ‘see’. But eating disorders are mental illnesses and can sometimes go under the radar for a long time.

Eating disorders vary from person to person. Though there are some signs and traits associated with specific eating disorders, a person does not have to show all of them to be ill. Changes to your child’s behaviour and mood will probably be noticeable well before changes to their appearance.

General signs of eating disorders

If your child has an eating disorder, they might show some of these general signs:

  • being preoccupied with food and/or secretive behaviour around food
  • self-consciousness when eating in front of others
  • low self-esteem
  • irritability and mood swings
  • tiredness
  • social withdrawal
  • feelings of shame, guilt, and anxiety

Some eating disorders have other more specific signs.
Possible signs of bulimia include:

  • changes in weight
  • disappearing after meals
  • a feeling of being out of control around food
  • sore skin on the backs of hands or fingers
  • bad breath or tooth decay

Possible signs of anorexia include:

  • weight loss, possibly hidden with baggy clothes
  • distorted perception of weight
  • being preoccupied with weight
  • obsessive behaviour, such as counting calories
  • difficulty focusing

Possible signs of binge eating disorder include:

  • weight gain
  • spending lots of money on food
  • feeling out of control around food
  • eating quicker than usual
  • eating when not hungry

Some eating disorders don’t fit the criteria to be diagnosed as anorexia, bulimia or binge eating disorder. Instead, it might be diagnosed as ‘other specified feeding or eating disorder’. This diagnosis isn’t any less serious. If your child has any eating disorder, it’s important to get them into treatment as quickly as possible to give them the best chance of a full and sustained recovery.


Worried about your child’s health? Call our Anytime HealthLine for 24/7 health advice

Health insurance isn’t just there for the big things, because it can often be those stomach cramps and headaches that can cause you to worry. That’s where our Anytime HealthLine comes in, with access to around the clock health advice from a trained nurse whenever you need it most.


Our health insurance has your family’s mental health covered

If you’re concerned about child’s mental health, we’re here to listen. We can arrange a telephone consultation with one of our counsellors. They’ll listen to your child’s concerns and discuss options to help them on the road to feeling better.

Acne affects most people at some point in their lives. Usually people experience it as a teenager or young adult, with around 8 in 10 people getting it at some point between ages 11 and 30. During puberty, production of the hormone testosterone leads to greasy skin, which results in the blockage of follicles.

Acne is caused by hair follicles (the cells around the root of a hair) and sebaceous glands (small glands on the skin) getting blocked and inflamed, causing lesions to form. These tend be spots (whiteheads and blackheads), but in more severe cases may form larger inflamed areas on your child’s skin.

In the long term, acne can lead to scarring and darkened patches of skin. Your child may experience depression and anxiety due to the social impact of the appearance of the condition.

Has your child got acne? Call our Anytime HealthLine for 24/7 health advice

Health insurance isn’t just there for the big things, and it’s often those rashes and spots that can cause your child to worry. That’s where our Anytime HealthLine comes in, with access to around the clock health advice from a trained nurse whenever you need it most.


Is acne covered on a Bupa policy?

Unfortunately we’re unable to provide cover for acne due to the following exclusions on our policy:

  • Screening, monitoring and preventative treatment – usually with acne you’d have to see a consultant to see how you’re responding to treatment.
  • Treatment to relieve symptoms associated with any bodily change arising from any physiological or natural cause such as ageing, menopause and puberty – acne would fall under this category.
  • Drugs and dressings needed for out-patient or take-home use – a consultant might prescribe drugs to treat acne.

You’ll find more about acne in our health information. Read more >

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^ We may record or monitor our calls. Lines are open Monday to Friday 8am to 8pm and Saturday 9am to 12.30pm.

Anytime HealthLine is not regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Bupa health insurance is provided by Bupa Insurance Limited. Registered in England and Wales No. 3956433. Bupa Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. Arranged and administered by Bupa Insurance Services Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Registered in England and Wales No. 3829851. Registered office: 1 Angel Court, London, EC2R 7HJ.

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